Lamu Island Cultural Tour

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alt Over a thousand years different generations from different origins; East African, Omani, Yemeni, Indian, Portuguese and Victorian British influences have all left their mark on Lamu Island, in the architecture, the language and the very essence of the place. In bustling Lamu, winding alleys lead past the intricate carved doorways of white stone houses -some of which are truly majestic and still home to the very wealthy. And, because the alleys are too narrow to be negotiated by cars, the modern world has had little visible impact on this historic town.

alt Life appears little changed since Lamu was a busy port town in the 14th century, donkeys remain the preferred local mode of transport, and the streets are lit by lanterns after nightfall.

Spices and the smell of grilled food scent the air around the markets, mosques, museums, fort and ancient houses, and exploring Lamu on foot - or donkey - is a treat for all the sense Sitting at an open-air restaurant by the water and watching the world go by is an irresistible past-time. Fishermen haul their catches ashore, locals walk or ride by, donkeys carry their cargo. Shopping for local woodcarvings and curios is another enjoyable experience.

Over the course of hundreds of previous years, the island has been shaped by local Bantu African tribes, Arab traders and Portuguese explorers.

The mix of cultures has created a fascinating history and a unique Swahili people and culture. Lamu includes one of the oldest inhabited cities in Kenya and Africa.